Hermann Hänle
9. March 2018 0
Automotive

Built for Speed

Can you think back and remember – your first Auto Quartet game? “280 kilometers per hour – wins!” We admired the “fastest cars in the world” with melodious names such as Ferrari, Bugatti and Lamborghini, which we would never actually see in real life.
By now, I rarely come across discussions about “well, how fast does it run?” Maybe it’s my own doing that not a single car dealer has wanted to sell me a car based on its maximum speed in recent years – when we show up at the dealership as a 4-member family with two elementary school kids. The car’s intelligence, autonomy, comfort, alternative drives and maybe also safety predominate the talks among car aficionados.

The topic of speed is currently resurging like a phoenix from the ashes. But not in terms of the fastest production vehicle in the world (and by the way: the Koenigsegg Agera with 447 km/h – wins! ;)), but in terms of latency. The quality of the car as a networked, smart object also depends on the speed with which data can be exchanged between the car and a cloud backend. In some cases, our survival may even depend on it: If a website takes one or two seconds to assemble, we’ll accept it. A car that takes one or two seconds to brake in a dangerous situation – actually, we’d prefer to do our own driving.
The autonomous car that hangs on the cloud backend needs solutions for speed. The magic words are low latency. Latency refers to the time needed to access the (required) data. The manufacturers rely on a mix of edge computing (dispersed computer power close to the car), on-board/embedded intelligence and fast network connections such as 5G.
Not only autonomous cars benefit from this speed; it can also be used profitably in development and production. Wherever speed has made it impossible to realize certain services, low latency based on fast networks and edge computing gets services on their feet. Low latency thus opens new doors for opportunities provided by mobile services.
At the AutomotiveIT congress, our partner start-ups show what low latency looks like live. Low latency solutions can be used profitably in the production process and while driving the car. INMACH/Adlatus Robotics and Holo-Light support the production with service robots and mixed reality. Yado-VR gives the car senses and processes LIDAR data in real time, VisionLabs, show a solution that monitors the driver’s tiredness while Smart Mobile Labs ensures that cars can talk to each other and even share video data.
If you haven’t decided yet: On March 22 in Berlin. There are still spaces available

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